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:: Lines ::

From the many years of teaching I've done over the past 28 years, I've seen a lot of players struggling with the same kinds of problems in a single string soloing situation. Simply put: how to move from point 'A' to point 'B' on the guitar neck in an interesting way. One good idea is to start playing all your scales, including Pentatonic, Diminished and Symmetrical scales playing three notes per string. You probably won't use it 'as is', but from this perspective it's easier to see the four note per string options, even if you don't use the 'four fingers per string' scales. It's also very clear from the three note per string perspective how to start skipping notes in the patterns, (playing '1-2-4' instead of '1-2-3' then going on to '1-4-2' and 1-3-4 etc.) eventually moving horizontally up and down the neck, even without making slides. Using the middle and index fingers of your right hand makes for better control playing large intervals across different strings.

I've transcribed a few lines I've recorded in the past for your enjoyment. It's a good idea to play the lines for all the scales you know, reverse them, change the rhythm around, etc. Make sure to always practise with a metronome or drumcomputer and before you know you'll be ripping your fellow guitar player's head off. I hope you can find some useful information in here.

 

This example is taken from the track 'Third Phase' from my new album RHPII. Around 12 sec into this soundclip, you'll hear the idea that's transcribed here. I don't play it note for note, but this line is where the idea for the solo on the recording came from.

 

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This is taken from the track 'A Demon's Kiss' from the cd 'Infinity Of Worlds' from Lalle Larsson. This is a pentatonic six-note sequence and it starts around 6 sec. into the soundcip here. The six-note phrase starts on the second beat of the second bar and has three notes on a string and then three notes on the string below that.
Note that the first two notes of each phrase are picked to get some more attack and make it sound less predictable and more ‘phrased’ then pulling off all notes.

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This is again from the track 'A Demon's Kiss'. The solo starts out with an E min7 vamp. Here, at 6 sec, I start of by playing E melodic minor over that vamp. After that, I use the chromatic scale to connect the E min7 going to the first chord of the B part, which is the B min7. In the first part, the chromatic scale is kind of messed up, in the end it’s more straight ahead chromatic.
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i play this line in the outtro for 'Bring It On' on RHPII where I trade solos with Guthrie Govan. I hit the 24th fret - I like the sound of that highest note on my guitar - and add some low notes with hybrid picking and left hand taps. Close your eyes and play this one as fast as possible! Note the 't' in the transcription is a note tapped with the left hand without picking.
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Here's one I did on "Cullera" (René Engel - 'Spheres Of Samarkand'). The solo starts off with a Db maj 7 flavour.The first bar outlines Bb (minor) Pentatonic, for a 'home' Db Ionian feel.Then I take it out with the F diminished scale, eventually going back into Db maj 7, but making it Lydian this time around for even more harmonic interest.
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This line is from piece called 'Equator', which I played exclusively on the VG-8. It's not released yet. It features some extended F# diminished lines over a pumping 'E' bass. It's a good idea to start involving the fingers of your right hand here to facilitate playing those large intervals.
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On the song 'Amelia' that I recorded for RHPII, there is a lot of Fmin7 to play over. On this example, I'm superimposing an Ebmaj7 triad with added notes over the Fmin7 chord to create some harmonic interest.
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Taken from 'Dirt' (Generator) this one is a sweep. It's an A diminished scale over an Ab7 flavoured bassline, outlining the chord tones of an Ab7/b9/#11 chord. It's a great idea to apply this form through different scales and sets of strings, it will surely open op new possibilities within scales.
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Here's a nice sequence in D pentatonic. Performing sequences might be a 'mathematical' approach, however, the outcome is very musical if you get a feel of how to 'break' the sequence and move it around the neck in an interesting and musical way. The sequence here is 2-3-1, meaning in a three note per string situation, the second note is played first, then the third note, etc. Performing this choice of notes with a two note per scale comfortably at a higher tempo shape would be a lot harder and it would sound way more 'practised' than this relaxed shape.Cool thing is that if your fingers know the 'reflex' you can apply this shape in any three note per string scale. Note how the line is displaced by skipping a few strings in the end.
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Here's kind of an interesting sound over a standard sounding rock riff. The riff (D5-C5) implies a D Dorian character. At the end of the first measure I change that to a D7 by playing an F# (major third) instead of an F and I add a bluesnote (G#) You can also look at it as being an Eb diminished scale which always works good for creating some tension over a standard riff like this.
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An example of connecting modes while playing through changes.This is played on a demo of an older original called 'Seasons'. The complete tracks was later reeased on the cd 'The Alchemists'. Note how the line starts of on the 2nd position of the A string, ending on the 12th fret of the high E string, all connected without making slides, which is a sound that I don't like to make much. The scale is Ab melodic minor played over a B maj7 #5.
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An example of a 6-note sequens 7 - 4 - 5 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 6. Repeating un uneven number of notes makes for a nice displaced rhythmic figure.
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Here are some cool rhythms to use with all the above phrases to get some variation.

update may/17/2016
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